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How to Make Millet Porridge (A Great Lectin-Free Oatmeal Substitute)

March 27, 2019 (Last Updated: October 21, 2023)
millet porridge

Creamy and comforting, this millet porridge is a delicious lectin-free alternative to oatmeal. While this is a breakfast porridge, it is the most soothing meal to have any time of the day because it’s so easy to personalize.

Does oatmeal have lectins?

Yes, oats and oatmeal are high in lectins. But don’t worry, there are plenty of delicious lectin-free alternatives to oatmeal. You can make porridge with millet, sorghum, teff, and fonio. All these are nutritious ancient grains that are lectin-free and gluten-free, making a comeback.

Many people have oatmeal or oat porridge for breakfast and consider it a healthy meal. I used to have oatmeal for breakfast before I started the plant paradox program, and I did not feel good. I was inflamed and packed pounds even though I was eating foods that were considered healthy, and I had what many would consider a healthy lifestyle.

When I embarked on a lectin-free diet, I was looking for something to replace my morning oatmeal, at least occasionally. What I wanted was something warm, creamy, and soothing. And the first lectin-free grain I learned to work with and make porridge was millet.

I recently started working with fonio. For a delicious porridge with fonio, try this creamy fonio porridge with almonds and blueberries.

Millet, an ancient grain making a comeback

Even though not as known in Western cuisine, millet has been around for a long time. Millet is an ancient grain used in cuisines worldwide, especially in Africa and Asia, but also in Europe, tracing back thousands of years.

It was the primary grain in China before rice became popular and the main grain in my native country, Romania, before corn was introduced in agriculture. Before wheat, Romans ate porridge or a type of polenta made with millet. It is still the primary grain in many African countries and is returning to Western diets.

Millet health benefits

Millet is a gluten-free and lectin-free grain, and it is high in protein, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, and lots of fiber that our gut bugs love.

There are claims that millet is not good for us because it contains goitrogenic substances, which can suppress the functioning of the thyroid gland.

But like with anything, moderation is the secret to consuming food without it becoming poison. Lectin-free or not, don’t have any grain porridge every day. I’m a big fan of rotating foods. Have millet porridge one day of the week, then have eggs, then pancakes, then a green smoothie, then some nuts with yogurt, and so on.

Millet grain in a bowl with a wooden spoon
Millet grain

How to pre-cook millet

Soaking millet is optional, but it does help with better digestion and better absorption of nutrients. Soak it for a few hours before cooking, changing the water several times, to activate the enzyme phytase, which then will help break down phytic acid, an anti-nutrient in grains that interferes with the absorption of nutrients.

To cook millet in a pressure cooker: toast 1 cup of millet until fragrant, 2 to 4 minutes, using the sauté option if available, add 2 cups of water, and pressure cook for 10 minutes. Let the pressure release naturally. Store in the refrigerator for a few days and use to make millet porridge. Millet gets dry when cold, and that’s why it is so perfect for porridge. Just rehydrate it with your favorite non-dairy milk.

To cook millet on the stove (for porridge): toast one cup of millet, add 4 cups of water, bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and simmer until all the water is absorbed, for about 30 minutes. Cool and refrigerate.

Pressure-cooked millet in a bowl. It looks nice and fluffy.
Pressure-cooked millet

Ingredients to make creamy millet porridge

  • 1 heaping cup of pre-cooked millet
  • about 2/3 cup unsweetened hemp milk / or other non-dairy milk, like tigernut milk or coconut milk
  • 1 teaspoon or more cinnamon powder
  • pinch of salt
  • 2 teaspoons nut butter
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • about 1/4 cup sliced, blanched, toasted almonds
  • a small handful of berries / seasonal fresh fruit
  • 1/2 teaspoon Yacon Syrup or another natural, zero-calorie sweetener
  • Optional: Lion’s Mane (or any mushroom powder you like), cacao nibs, grated chocolate, coconut flakes

How to make millet porridge (using pre-cooked millet)

  • In a saucepan, mix the pre-cooked millet with 1/2 cup milk and reheat on the stove, on low to medium heat. Once hot, start adding the rest of the milk. You can add as much as you need to reach your favorite consistency.
  • Turn the heat to low, and add the vanilla, half of the almonds, the coconut oil, the nut butter, cinnamon, and salt.
  • Mix it all, and add more milk if you feel it is too thick. Add the mushroom powder, if using, and mix well.
  • Add the porridge to serving bowls, sprinkle with more cinnamon, the rest of the almonds, a few berries, and a drizzle of Yacon Syrup.

More lectin-free breakfast ideas

This recipe is part of The Ultimate Lectin-Free Breakfast Guide, Recipe Round-Up; check it out for more tasty and satisfying lectin-free breakfast ideas.

More gluten-free and lectin-free millet recipes

And if you want to read more about the four gluten-free and lectin-free grains, millet, sorghum, fonio, and teff, check out this article: The four gut-healthy, lectin-free, and gluten-free grains.

*This post contains affiliated links, which means I get a small commission if you choose to purchase something via one of my links, at no extra cost to you.

How to Make Millet Porridge (A Great Lectin-Free Oatmeal Substitute)

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By Claudia Curici, Health Coach Serves: 2
Prep Time: 5 minutes Cooking Time: 5-10 minutes

A lectin-free alternative to oats porridge and a great plant-based breakfast option.

Ingredients

  • 1 heaping cup pre-cooked millet (check the post above for instructions on how to pre-cook millet)
  • about 2/3 cup unsweetened hemp milk / or other non-dairy milk, like coconut milk
  • 1 teaspoon or more cinnamon powder
  • pinch of salt
  • 2 teaspoons nut butter
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • about 1/4 cup sliced, blanched, toasted almonds
  • a small handful of berries / seasonal fruits
  • 1/2 teaspoon Yacon Syrup or another natural, zero-calorie sweetener
  • Optional: Lion's Mane (or any mushroom powder you like), cacao nibs, grated chocolate, coconut flakes

Instructions

1

In a saucepan, mix the pre-cooked millet with 1/2 cup milk and reheat on the stove, on low to medium heat. Once hot, start adding the rest of the milk. You can add as much as you need to reach your favorite consistency.

2

Turn the heat to the lowest, and add the vanilla, half of the almonds, the coconut oil, the nut butter, cinnamon, and salt.

3

Mix it all, and add more milk if you feel is too thick. Add the mushroom powder if using, and mix well.

4

Add the porridge to serving bowls, sprinkle with more cinnamon, the rest of the almonds, a few berries, and a drizzle of Yacon Syrup.

Notes

To cook millet in a pressure cooker: toast 1 cup of millet until fragrant, 2 to 4 minutes, using the sauté option if available, add 2 cups of water, and pressure cook for 10 minutes. Let the pressure release naturally. Store in the refrigerator for a few days and use to make millet porridge. To cook millet on the stove (for porridge): toast one cup of millet, add 4 cups of water, bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low and simmer until all the water is absorbed, for about 30 minutes. Cool and refrigerate.

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22 Comments

  • Reply
    Ludmila
    February 1, 2024 at 2:39 pm

    Hi, another question I have, since the pressure cooker removes the lectins, can we stil préparé oatmeal in pressure cooker, as beens or chickpeas?

    • Reply
      Claudia
      February 2, 2024 at 7:46 am

      Hi Ludmila, oats are contaminated with glyphosate, even the organic ones. Pressure cooking does not remove glyphosate. Dr. Gundry doesn’t not recommend oats in any way, but of course, you can eat it if you want to. There are so many great alternatives! -Claudia

  • Reply
    Ludmila
    February 1, 2024 at 2:32 pm

    Hi Claudia, I am a begginer in no lectins food and I am à very inspired by your blog and receipes! I bought an organic hulled millet and it says on the package Carbohydrate 33g per 1/4 cup, it seems à lot of sugar. What do you think about?

    • Reply
      Claudia
      February 2, 2024 at 7:50 am

      Hi Ludmila! Yes, all grains and pseudo grains are high in carbohydrates. You can still work it into your macros. 1/4 cups of raw millet gives more than 1 cup of cooked millet and if you mix it with good fats, proteins and fiber, is not going to affect you that much. I stay on a low/medium carb plan, and I can afford 60g of carbs in a day when I’m not working out (non starchy vegetables are not counted). Also, in carb cycling days we need even more. So 33g in 1/4 raw millet is not a big deal if you know how to include it in your macros. I hope this helps. -Claudia

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