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Gluten-Free Sourdough Bread Recipe With Sorghum and Millet (Lectin-Free)

Making artisan lectin-free and gluten-free sourdough bread has been one of the most exciting and rewarding projects in my past five years of food blogging and healthy cooking and eating. Making sourdough bread is not rocket science, as I used to believe, and it is my mission to demystify the process and show you that anyone can do it.

Even in the absence of gluten, this bread looks and tastes like real bread. My dad, a big bread lover, who was raised with real bread made with freshly milled grains, said this was the best bread he’s ever had. Like all Danish people, my husband loves his bread, and even to my surprise, he is a convert.

My friend in Dallas, Kristi, who has been my sourdough buddy, is now making bread for her family and friends. Everyone loves it. Like myself, Kristi has never made sourdough bread in her life before. We want to assure you that if we did it, you can too.

If you are new to this process like we were, you have to start making a lectin-free and gluten-free sourdough starter. You will find all the instructions in the below-linked article. While the article is long because I wanted to cover every detail possible, the process is easy and only takes a few minutes of your day for six days.

What are the three lectin-free and gluten-free flours we will be using to make sourdough bread?

Sorghum Flour

Sorghum flour is obtained from ground sorghum grain and is also called jowar flour. It is commonly used in India to make jowar roti, an unleavened flatbread made with only hot water, sorghum flour, and salt.

Sorghum flour is also very popular for lectin-free, gluten-free baking, especially for making sourdough starters and bread.

Millet flour

Humans have consumed millets for thousands of years. They are still important crops in many countries in Asia and Africa. In Romania, my home country, millet was the staple grain before the introduction of wheat and corn, and millet was an important ingredient for different types of bread and porridge in the Roman world. Millet is also very popular in Ukraine and Russia.

Millet flour is excellent for making lectin-free and gluten-free sourdough bread and gives the bread a light look, like white wheat. It’s also a mild-tasting flour. Old millet flour can get bitter, so make sure you buy good flour and store it appropriately.

Teff flour

Teff has long been considered a gluten-free flour but only recently has been added to the list of lectin-free flours by Dr. Steven Gundry. Like the above cousins, this grain is a staple in many countries worldwide, used to make flatbread, sourdough bread, and porridge.

Teff flour is used to make the famous injera, the Ethiopian fermented flatbread.

Fermentation is key to health. All grains need to be fermented. Sourdough culture is this mixed ecosystem of bacteria and yeast slowly breaking down the carbohydrates and gluten and releasing the nutrients in the grain.

Richard Bourdon

Other ingredients

Tapioca flour. While I try to reduce unnecessary starch used in baking, in the absence of gluten, this bread needs a little boost. Compared to other gluten-free sourdough bread recipes, which are heavy in starches, the quantity of tapioca flour used for one loaf is 70 grams. Sometimes I also use 50 grams, but 70g is a sweet spot I’m happy with.

Psyllium husk. An essential ingredient for gluten-free bread. In the absence of gluten, psyllium husk is the sticky agent that will bind everything together (what the gluten network does in the case of gluten bread). Always use flakes, not powder.

Water. I think I will repeat this many times during the article. It’s crucial never to use chlorinated water or reverse osmosis water at any stage of making sourdough, from washing the fruits to creating the yeast water to making the bread. Use spring, filtered, or bottled water.

Salt. In the case of gluten-free sourdough, salt is mainly used for taste. I’m not exactly sure how much salt influences fermentation in our case. Always use a good quality fine sea salt, non-iodized.

Extra virgin olive oil. Oil will help with the texture of gluten-free bread. You can use between 5-12 grams, but I settle at 6 grams. More than this, I feel it makes the texture gooey and moist, which I am not a fan of. I’ve made bread with zero oil, and they were quite good; not much change in the texture but a little drier, which is not necessarily bad with gluten-free bread, which tends to be moist and sticky. But, since I love olive oil so much, and I think adding oil lowers the glycemic index of carbs, I’ll always add a little bit.

Honey. The best quality honey you can get is local, raw, and organic from a trusted producer. Honey will give the preferment a boost as the bacteria will feed with the sugar in honey. You can skip the honey if you are vegan.

Add-ons. Later, after we perfect a basic bread, we can play with additions such as lectin-free seeds, olives, herbs, and spices.

Ingredient shopping list:

Sourdough equipement & tool list:

You will need some tools in order to make sourdough bread. You might already have some jars, spatulas, glass bowls, towels, a Dutch oven, and parchment paper. Some are more specific, like the proofing basket or the razor for scoring. Below you have a checking list to understand what you already have and what more you need. These are just suggestions:

The above ingredients and equipment can also be found on our shop site under the category ‘project sourdough’.

Recipe: Sorghum & Millet Sourdough Bread (Gluten-Free, Lectin-Free)

I will start by sharing the recipe I like the most so far. This bread is made with an equal mix of sorghum and millet flour. To add more texture to the bread, sometimes I use a mix of finely ground and whole grain flour for each of the two flours, but that’s not necessary, and you can add this step later when you are getting used to making lectin-free and gluten-free sourdough bread.

When I make a sorghum and millet bread, my preferment will be made with sorghum and millet; when I make only teff bread, my preferment will be made with only teff flour; when I make a bread with the three flours, my preferment will be made of equal amounts of the three flours (in this case I will use the premix I use to feed my starter) and so on.

VIDEOS: I made a few videos so you have a visual of the process. If you are a visual person like me, these will greatly help. Please check them out (a few paragraphs below). You will see that while the text had to be very long so I could cover all the details, the process is pretty straightforward.

The first step: Make the preferment

Any bread starts with a preferment. The preferment, at least in our case, is made the same way as if you would feed the starter. Please consider feeding your starter first and make sure you know which one it is (if you use similar jars). Only after you fed your starter can you proceed to make the preferment.

You will make one preferment for each loaf you are planning to bake.

Usually, if you feed your starter twice a day, in the morning and evening, you will make the preferment in the evening, when you also feed your starter.

Once you get used to making bread and want to experiment more, you can try to feed your starter three times that day (morning, midday, and evening) and make the preferment in the evening. The reason this could be helpful is that the starter takes about 5 hours to reach its peak of activity, and if you make a preferment with a starter that was fed about 5 hours ago, you will probably get a more active preferment. I would not worry about this at the start though. Most of the time I do it the usual way and I have no problems with the bread.

To make the preferment for a loaf of bread, use the following quantities:

  • 10 grams active starter (before you feed it)
  • 30 grams filtered / spring water
  • 35 grams of flour (the flour that you will be using to make the bread, in this case, equal quantities of sorghum + millet)

The difference between feeding the starter and the preferment:

  • They both use the same quantities; however, the starter will always be fed with the three flour mix, while the preferment will always be fed with the flour or mix you are using for the bread. In case you will make a loaf of bread using equal quantities of teff + sorghum + millet, the preferment will be the exact same thing as the starter.

MY BAKING SCHEDULE:

  • Evening (before sleep): I feed my starter and make a preferment with the flours I plan to use for the bread.
  • Morning (shortly after I wake up): I feed my starter and mix the dough ingredients. Start the fermentation process.
  • After about 1h of fermentation, I check the dough. If it’s ready, I shape it and transfer it to the proofing basket.
  • Usually my dough proofs in about 1h, so now I start to preheat the oven with the Dutch oven in.
  • After one more hour, I check the dough and if it’s ready, I score it and transfer it to the Dutch oven.
  • I bake the bread for 40 minutes with the lid on, then I take the lid off and bake for 40 more minutes. The temperature is always set at 250C/480F.
  • I take the Dutch oven out careful so I don’t burn myself. Remove the bread and place it on a cooling rack.
  • Wait for at least 5 hours before slicing it.

Ingredients for making lectin-free and gluten-free sourdough bread

While it might not show in the ingredient list, AIR is the most important ingredient in sourdough bread. Luckly, air is democratically available and free. We just have to acquire the skills to incorporate it into our bread.

There is something very magical about cooking with air.

Michael Pollan, COOKED

The wet mix:

  • 17 grams psyllium husk flakes (not powder)
  • 420 grams of room temperature water (spring, filtered, bottled, no chlorine, no tap, and don’t use reverse osmosis water)
  • 10 grams organic, raw honey, preferably local (skip if vegan)
  • 6 grams extra virgin olive oil
  • 75 grams sorghum + millet preferment (made the night before)

The dry mix:

  • 230 grams flour (115g sorghum + 115 millet)
  • 70 grams starch (tapioca flour)
  • 6 grams non-iodized good quality fine salt

NOTE: generally speaking, you can use any mix of the three flours you want, or just one flour, but if you are using teff, you might need to adjust the quantity of water, as some brands of teff flour absorb more water. In this case, start with the initial quantities, and when you mix the dough with you hands, if you feel it’s too dry, add 10-20 more grams of water. Also, in my experience, teff tends to ferment faster, so you will have to consider this.

Mixing method

  • In a glass or plastic bowl, combine the water, psyllium husk flakes, honey, and extra virgin olive oil. Mix well and set it on the side. Once the psyllium husks absorb the water, this mixture will have a jelly-like texture (it needs about 5 minutes).
  • In the meantime, mix all the dry ingredients in a glass bowl.
  • Now add the preferment to the psyllium husk jelly. Mix well with a spatula or wooden spoon.
  • Add the preferment jelly mixture to the dry ingredients bowl, incorporate as much as possible with a spatula or wooden spoon, then start mixing with your hand. Mix well until the dough is homogeneous and has no lumps. The dough is soft and sticky.
  • Now you can start mixing with the silicone or plastic dough scraper, scraping the dough from the sides of the bowl, and folding it into the center. Rotate the bowl and repeat with the same movement, for about 1 minute. Please watch the video below for a visual guide.
  • Cover the bowl with a plastic cover, then wrap it in two extra big plastic bags and tighten the bags. From now on the fermentation starts. I keep my bowl on the kitchen counter. Ideally, it needs a place where the temperature stays constant throughout the process.

Bulk fermentation

Let it ferment for 1 to 2 hours, depending on the temperature and humidity in your house. At about 20 degrees Celcius (68 degrees Fahrenheit), it can take 2 hours. If it’s hotter than that, the time will decrease. At about 72-74 degrees Fahrenheit, my bulk fermentation takes about 1 hour. Make sure your bowl is covered with a plastic wrap, with additional plastic wrapped around it (I used two big plastic bags and tight them well).

Shaping the dough

The videos above will be the most helpful here. Gently invert the dough on a working surface, dusted with just a tiny bit of flour. Gently lift one-third of the dough and fold it on top of itself. Then fold it one more time, so now what was on the bottom on the working surface is on the top. The following step is to shape the dough and seal the bottom part. Please watch the video, Part 1.

Proofing the dough

Ensure the lining of your Banneton or proofing basket (or a towel if it doesn’t have a liner) is dusted with flour. Now that the dough is sealed and shaped, gently transfer it to the proofing basket with the sealed side up. This is the Part 2 Video. Dust the top with flour, and cover with a plastic wrap or wrap it in a towel. Because my house is pretty dry, I spray a little bit of water on the towel. I cover it in the plastic wrap, and then in two plastic bags that I tight very well. Again, you might not need these extra steps in your house, but since I moved to Denmark, I needed this extra step to help with a healthy proofing of my dough.

Scoring and transferring to the oven

So many new terms to learn if you are new to baking sourdough bread! Scoring refers to the process of cutting a slash into the surface of the dough before baking. This is best done with a razor. Check my list of tools above for a suggestion. A simple razor will work, but having a handle makes the process easier and safer. The reason for scoring is to let some air out when your dough will rise in the oven (what is called ‘oven spring’).

An extra tool you will need for this step, is a spray bottle with filtered water. You will spray the dough on top before you cover it.

There are the steps:

  • When the dough is proofed and your oven and cast iron are preheated, gently invert the dough from the basket to the middle of a parchment paper sheet.
  • Dust the dough with flour (any of the flours you are using, I prefer sorghum or millet) and gently spread it on the surface of the dough with your palm. Have the razor ready for scoring.
  • Now it’s time to carefully remove the cast iron and the lid from the oven, closing the door quickly. This is when you need to work pretty fast but be careful not to burn yourself.
  • Make the scoring of your choice (I’ll post a link below with one of my favorite scoring and also an easy one to make). From this point on, the dough needs to quickly go into the cast iron, covered, and into the oven.
  • Lift the dough with the edges of the parchment paper and gently lower it into the cast iron. Spray the dough with water to create steam, cover it with the lid, and put it back in the oven.
  • Bake covered for 40 minutes.
  • After 40 minutes, carefully remove the lid and bake for 40 more minutes.

Check out this scoring video by Foodgeek.dk, my favorite scoring for a boule is Palm Leaf (5:43). I think is very easy for a beginner and looks great on the baked bread. When you have time check more of his videos, we can learn a lot from him, even if he only makes gluten bread.

Baking

You need to preheat the oven to 250C / 480F for one hour before baking. I usually start the oven when I start the proofing (because my proofing at the moment lasts between 1h and 1h 20mins).

Because I love the results this method gives me, I will provide you with the Dutch oven instructions, but know there are other ways to bake sourdough bread. You are also preheating your Dutch oven for one hour, with the lid on the side. Please ensure your Dutch oven can stand this high heat and that the cover has a heatproof handle. At first, I was a little worried my pretty red cocotte from Staub would not take such a high temperature but it is doing just fine.

Alternatively, you can get a cast iron made for baking sourdough bread (check the list of tools above).

You can also bake the bread on a pizza stone or directly on the oven tray. The Duch oven and cast iron methods give a better crust, that is why I prefer them, but you can make an excellent bread with other methods.

Making gluten-free sourdough bread: The fermentation process

The yeast consumes the sugars during fermentation, causing the dough to form air pockets and rise.

With fluctuating weather, changes of seasons, or changing countries like in my case, it can be hard to control the temperature and humidity of your dough and the fermentation times. That’s why, in my experience, the most challenging part of making sourdough bread is knowing if your dough is under-proofed, proofed just right, or over-proofed.

While it might be tempting to want a big rise, when the dough looks big and round and feels very light and jiggly, is usually over-proofed. It is under-proofed when the dough doesn’t look like it has changed much in size and still feels heavy. A perfect rise is not bigger than double compared to how you started (before the first fermentation). The dough feels airy but not too light and has a slight jiggle to it.

We tried the poke test, but we concluded it is not very useful for lectin-free, gluten-free sourdough bread.

The process of fermentation of the dough is split into two parts:

  1. Bulk fermentation occurs when the dough ferments in the bowl you mix it in. This will take somewhere between 1 hour and 2 hours. The bulk fermentation is complete when you observe boules on the bottom and sides of the glass bowl, and the dough has risen about 30% in size. When I started in the winter in Romania, my first fermentation time was 2 hours. When I’m writing this in Denmark, it takes about 1 hour. As a rough estimation, if the room temperature is 20C/68F, it will take about 2 hours; if it’s 22C/72F, it will take about 1 hour.
  2. Proofing is the part of the fermentation that occurs after you shape the bread and place it in the banneton or proofing basket. This will also take somewhere between 1 hour and 2 hours. As a rough estimation, if the room temperature is 20C/68F it will take about 2 hours, if it’s 22C/72F, it will take about 1 hour.
Dough after bulk fermentation
Dough after proofing
Over-proofed dough

In each phase, I check after one hour to see what the dough looks like. If I feel it needs a little more, I add extra 10 minutes, then check again. Sometimes, in my weather conditions in Denmark, I do about 1h or 1h 10 mins in the first phase and 1h or up to 1h 20mins for the second phase. It happened to me to overproof the dough when it was hotter outside.

NOTE: Fermentation and proofing can be done at any temperature, including in the refrigerator. Lower temperatures will delay the process, so if you make the dough and don’t have time for it right now, you can put it in the fridge. Fermentation and proofing will happen in the fridge, at a slower rate, so you can also over-ferment a dough in the fridge. The image you see above (the 3rd picture from the left, with the over-proffed dough) is a dough I tried to proof overnight in the fridge. Obviously 12 hours was too much.

Under-proofed bread (bursts on the bottom and sides)
Over-proofed bread (hollow top and doughy bottom)
Proofed just right

Frequently asked questions:

Is all sourdough bread gluten-free?

Only sourdough bread made with certified gluten-free flours in a gluten-free facility are truly gluten-free. So, if you have severe allergies to gluten or are diagnosed as celiac, you will have to make sure the flours you used are not contaminated. However, many people who have a sensitivity to gluten, will be able to tolerate any sourdough bread, even the one made with gluten flour.

Is all lectin-free sourdough bread also gluten-free?

Yes! All sourdough bread made with lectin-free flours is also gluten-free, provided the ingredients used are certified gluten-free and there is no cross contamination. Naturally, gluten is a lectin, so anything that is lectin-free is also gluten-free.

I want to make this bread. Where do I start?

Start by making your own starter. The process is explained in details here: Gluten-Free Sourdough Starter With Millet, Teff and Sorghum Flour (Lectin-Free).

I want to make sourdough bread, but I’m so intimidated by the process

I understand! I was for many years. I always thought is the hardest thing to make and require qualities I don’t have. But once I started, I fell in love with the process. Preparing your own sourdough bread is the most exciting and rewarding cooking experience you can have.

I’m scared I won’t be able to keep my starter alive

Making sourdough bread is like any long term project, hobby, passion, or even having a pet. You have to dedicate it a little bit of time and attention to nourish it. But there are ways to put it on hold if let’s say you are not home for a while. You can put your starter in the fridge without having to feed it. You can dry your starter, travel with it and reactivate it. You can also make a bread schedule that will fit your lifestyle. You can make bread only in the weekends. You can make more than one bread at a time. And you can slice it store it in the freezer.

I made the dough but I have to leave the house. What do I do?

You can put the dough in the fridge, at any stage of the fermentation process. Just keep in mind that it will continue to ferment in the fridge, just at a slower pace.

Can I freeze this bread?

Yes you can. I don’t have time to make bread every day, so whenever I can I make a bread even if I don’t need it that day. Then I slice it, separate the slices with parchement paper and freeze it. When I want to eat it I defreeze it in my toaster and then toast it.

Do I really have to wait for 5 hours before I slice the bread?

There is no way around it. You have to wait. And I even think overnight is even better. This way all the moisture from the bread has time to come out. You will ruin your bread if you slice it before.

I don’t have a Duch oven. Can I bake the bread without one?

Yes, you certainly can. I actually bake bread directly on the oven tray, but I like the Dutch oven because it makes the crust more crispy and think, how I prefer it. If you bake it directly on the oven tray, you preheat the oven to 250C (480F), drop to 230C (450F) when putting the bread in (on a piece of parchment paper), add a tray with a small quantity of hot water in, and bake it with steam for 20 minutes. Take the water tray out, turn the oven down to 220C (430F) and bake it for about 40 more minutes, or until the bread sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom. Depending on your oven you might have to experiment with different times and temperatures.

I made a dough but will not have enough time to bake it before it over-proofs. Can I save this dough?

Yes you can. Leave the dough in the fridge until you are ready. Then take it out, split it into 8 balls, then flatten each one using your hands, a rolling pin and a lot of flour, until you get a very thin sheet of dough. Brush it with olive oil and herbs, sprinkle with sea salt flakes and make flatbread (bake for about 12-15 minutes at 240C/460F). Or, use it to make a pizza crust, but don’t roll it so thin.

Can I save an over-proofed bread?

I actually cut any good parts of the bread in cubes and freeze it. Then I use it to make croutons or bread crumbs.

My bread looks moist and gummy. Is that normal?

Gluten-free bread tends to have a moister texture than normal bread. But if it’s too moist or sticky there are a few things you can do. Give it more time, a few extra hours will make a difference. Next time bake it longer. Toast it after slicing it.

Can I make another shape of bread?

Yes, you can also make a battard (the long shape). There are now proofing baskets in all kind of shapes, including triangles. You can use any of those, just make sure is the right size for this bread (not bigger than 1kg).

Have more questions? Need help with troubleshooting your lectin-free and gluten-free sourdough bread?

Join our Facebook Private Group – Creative In My Kitchen and we will find a way to fix your problem or answer your questions. Or comment below.

Resources and inspiration:

  • Ana A. Negru – Artisan baker in Romania, with whom I took a paid workshop and made my first ever lectin-free and gluten-free sourdough loaves. You find her on Instagram @sourdough_storytelling. She is a great teacher so you can book workshops with her if you are interested.
  • Michael Pollan – I am so fascinated about his view on food in general and making sourdough bread in particular. I recommend you watch COOKED on Netflix.
  • GeorgeEats.com
  • The Guardian: From starter to loaf: how to make gluten-free sourdough bread from scratch
  • Foodgeek.dk, especially the videos about scoring, but in general, watching him making sourdough is entertaining and educational.
  • And so much more…

I’m very grateful for all the free resources about making sourdough bread, and especially those aproaching troubleshooting. I probably read them all while I was trying to figure out why, after I moved to Denmark, I wasn’t able to make good bread like I was making in Romania.

I am beyond grateful for my friend Kristi, from Dallas, who joined me in this challenge. I don’t think this article would be possible without her. We hope that everything we learned during this time is reflected in this article and you will not have to go through the same issues we did. And we won’t stop here. We have pizza, focaccia, flatbread, and more to share with you in the future.

*This post contains affiliated links, which means I get a small commission if you choose to purchase something via one of my links, at no extra cost to you.

Gluten-Free Sorghum & Millet Sourdough Bread (Lectin-Free)

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By Claudia Curici Serves: 1 loaf
Prep Time: 30 minutes Cooking Time: 1 hour 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • FOR THE PREFERMENT (make the night before):
  • 10 grams unfed starter (using the starter you fed earlier in the day)
  • 30 grams of water (spring, filtered, non-chlorinated)
  • 35 grams of flour mix (for this bread, equal quantities of sorghum and millet)
  • THE WET MIX:
  • 17 grams psyllium husk flakes (not powder)
  • 420 grams of water (spring, filtered, bottled, no chlorine, no tap, and don't use reverse osmosis water)
  • 10 grams organic, raw honey, preferably local
  • 6 grams extra virgin olive oil
  • 75 grams sorghum + millet preferment (made the night before)
  • THE DRY MIX:
  • 230 grams flour (115g sorghum + 115 millet)
  • 70 grams starch (tapioca flour)
  • 6 grams non-iodized good quality fine salt

Instructions

1

MAKE THE PREFERMENT:

2

Mix all the ingredients the night before (you will prepare the dough in the morning)

3

THE MIXING METHOD:

4

In a glass or plastic bowl, combine the water, psyllium husk flakes, honey, and extra virgin olive oil. Mix well and set it on the side. Once the psyllium husks absorb the water, this mixture will have a jelly-like texture (it needs about 5 minutes).

5

In the meantime, mix all the dry ingredients in a glass bowl.

6

Now add the preferment to the psyllium husk jelly. Mix well with a spatula or wooden spoon.

7

Add the preferment jelly mixture to the dry ingredients bowl, incorporate as much as possible with a spatula or wooden spoon, then start mixing with your hand. Mix well until the dough is homogeneous and has no lumps. The dough is soft and sticky.

8

Now you can start mixing with the silicone or plastic dough scraper, scraping the dough from the sides of the bowl, and folding it into the center. Rotate the bowl and repeat with the same movement, for about 1 minute. Please watch the video in the post above for a visual guide.

9

Cover the bowl with a plastic cover, then wrap in two extra big plastic bags and tighten the bags. From now on the fermentation starts. I keep my bowl on the kitchen counter. Ideally, it needs a place where the temperature stays constant throughout the process.

10

BULK FERMENTATION:

11

Let it ferment for 1 to 2 hours, depending on the temperature and humidity in your house. At about 20 degrees Celcius (68 degrees Fahrenheit), it can take 2 hours. If it's hotter than that, the time will decrease. At about 72-74 degrees Fahrenheit, my bulk fermentation takes about 1 hour.

12

SHAPING THE DOUGH:

13

The videos will be the most helpful here, please watch them. Gently invert the dough on a working surface, dusted with just a tiny bit of flour. Gently lift one-third of the dough and fold it on top of itself. Then fold it one more time, so now what was on the bottom on the working surface is on the top. The following step is to shape the dough and seal the bottom part.

14

PROOFING THE DOUGH:

15

Ensure the lining of your Banneton or proofing basket (or a towel if it doesn't have a liner) is dusted with flour. Now that the dough is sealed and shaped, gently transfer it to the proofing basket with the sealed side up, as shown in Part 2 Video. Dust the top with flour, and cover with a plastic wrap or wrap it in a towel. Because my house is pretty dry, I spray a little bit of water on the towel. I cover it in the plastic wrap, and then in two plastic bags that I tight very well. Again, you might not need these extra steps in your house. The proofing time will about the same as the bulk fermentation. At 72F it might be 1h or a little more. Whenever I use teff flour in my bread, fermentation time, in general, tends to lower (read more about my fermentation times and experience in the post above).

16

SCORING AND TRANSFERRING TO THE OVEN:

17

When the dough is proofed and your oven and cast iron are preheated, gently invert the dough from the basket to the middle of a parchment paper sheet.

18

Dust the dough with flour (any of the flours you are using, I prefer sorghum or millet) and gently spread it on the surface of the dough with your palm. Have the razor ready for scoring.

19

Now it's time to carefully remove the cast iron and the lid from the oven, closing the door quickly. This is when you need to work pretty fast but be careful not to burn yourself.

20

Make the scoring of your choice using the razor or the scoring blade (please check my suggestions in the post; keep it simple and easy in the beginning). After scoring, the dough needs to quickly go into the cast iron, covered, and into the oven.

21

Lift the dough with the edges of the parchment paper and gently lower it into the cast iron. Spray the dough with water to create steam, cover it with the lid, and put it back in the oven. Alternatively, you can throw an ice cube into the pan, but not on top of the bread, somewhere next to it, below the paper.

22

Bake covered for 40 minutes.

23

After 40 minutes, carefully remove the lid and bake for 40 more minutes.

24

Take the pan out, and carefully remove the bread. You can check the bottom for the hollow sound.

25

Let the bread rest on a cooling rack for at least 5 hours. I know it can be tempting, but don't slice it earlier than 5 hours, as you will ruin the texture.

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