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Sorghum Sandwich Bread (Gluten-Free)

July 8, 2024

Our fluffy, light, and soft gluten-free sorghum bread is perfect for satisfying all your sandwich and toast cravings. This easy-to-make recipe requires no special equipment or premade flour mixes—just a handful of simple, globally accessible gluten-free (and lectin-free) ingredients.

Many gluten-free bread recipes rely on flour mixes that can be too starchy and contain additives like gums (also, most are made with non-organic ingredients). In contrast, this sorghum bread is made solely with organic sorghum flour and a bit of tapioca starch (to help with the structure).

Not only is it gluten-free, but it’s also lectin-free, as it doesn’t include rice, corn, and other starch- and lectin-heavy ingredients commonly found in gluten-free flour mixes.

Sourdough vs. Commercial Yeast

If you’re new to this website, I’ve been baking gluten-free and lectin-free bread for several years. My favorite method is using a sourdough starter. For those interested, you can explore more in my Beginners’ Guide to Baking Gluten-Free Sourdough. This recipe is based on my sourdough method but adapted to use commercial yeast.

While gluten-free sourdough bread will always be my top choice, I understand that not everyone is ready to embark on their sourdough journey. If this is you, this sorghum sandwich bread, made with commercial yeast, is an excellent alternative.

Sorghum sandwich bread with butter

Testing this Recipe

Before publishing, I wanted to ensure the recipe worked in various scenarios by having others test it. Here’s some feedback from two wonderful readers who helped me out.

While I used a Pullman Pan (dimensions provided in the recipe), one reader used a regular tin loaf pan, and the other used a glass loaf pan. There were no noticeable differences in the crumb or appearance of the bread, except for the shape. Their crusts did develop a slightly deeper color than mine.

The feedback was overwhelmingly positive: the bread was very good, soft, and fluffy. One tester mentioned it could use a bit more salt. However, I’ll keep the salt at 6 grams in the recipe, allowing you to adjust if desired. Be cautious, as too much salt can inhibit yeast activity. Alternatively, you can use salty butter when serving or sprinkle some sea salt flakes with the seeds when topping.

Tuna sandwich made with sorghum bread

Ingredients

While this recipe is based on my gluten-free sourdough method, for a softer sandwich bread, we need to enrich the dough with eggs and sour cream. If you want a dairy-free, egg-free bread, check out our Sourdough Loaf with Millet and Sorghum.

Wet Ingredients:

  • 17 grams psyllium husk flakes (whole psyllium, NOT powder)
  • 10 grams maple syrup
  • 10 grams extra virgin olive oil
  • 350 grams lukewarm water (not warmer than 35°C)

Dry Ingredients:

  • 230 grams sorghum flour
  • 70 grams tapioca flour (also called tapioca starch)
  • 6 grams salt
  • 3 grams active dry yeast

Add-Ons:

  • 2 eggs (115 grams)
  • 40 grams organic sour cream or crème fraîche
  • Mixed seeds for topping (optional)
Sliced sorghum bread

Instructions:

This bread does not require any special equipment. I mix it with my hands but feel free to use a standing mixer if you have one. I use a Pullman pan (without the lid) to get the square, typical sandwich loaf shape, but you can bake this bread in a regular tin loaf pan.

The Pullman Pan I use is what in the US is called the Mini-size as opposed to Large), which is about 7” x 4” x 4”.

  • Prepare Wet Ingredients: Mix the psyllium husk flakes, maple syrup, olive oil, and lukewarm water in a bowl. Let the mixture sit for a few minutes until it becomes gelatinous.
  • Combine Dry Ingredients: In a larger bowl, combine sorghum flour, tapioca flour, salt, and yeast. Mix well.
  • Form Dough: Add the gelatinous mixture to the dry ingredients. Mix thoroughly with your hand for about 5 minutes until you achieve a homogeneous dough. Shape the dough into a ball using a plastic dough scraper.
  • First Rise: Cover the bowl with the dough, place it in a plastic bag, and let it rest on the counter for 15 minutes.
  • Prepare Add-Ons: While the dough is resting, whisk the eggs and measure out 115 grams. Remove the sour cream or crème fraîche from the fridge so they aren’t too cold when added to the dough.
  • Incorporate Add-Ons: After 15 minutes, mix the eggs and sour cream and add to the dough. Mix well with your hand until fully incorporated and the dough is soft and homogeneous (it will be quite soft, don’t worry).
  • Second Rise: Cover the bowl again, place it back in the plastic bag, and let it rest for another 15 minutes.
  • Prepare Pan: Line a Pullman pan (7” x 4” x 4”) with parchment paper for easy removal of the bread. A normal loaf pan can also be used, but the bread will have a different shape.
  • Final Rise: After the second rise, transfer the dough to the prepared pan, level it, sprinkle with seeds, cover it, and place it back in the plastic bag. Let it rise for about 35-40 minutes until the dough almost doubles in size. Make sure it doesn’t raise too much, as it will overproof.
The step-by-step process for creating delicious sorghum sandwich bread

  • Bake: Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C). Once the dough has doubled, bake for about 40-45 minutes.
  • Cool: Remove the bread from the pan and place it on a cooling rack. Let it cool completely before slicing.
Sorghum bread resting on a cooling rack

Notes

About the yeast: I use active dry yeast from Denmark, which is mixed with the dry ingredients, as per the package instructions. If you use a different type, adjust accordingly using an online yeast conversion calculator. 

About proofing time: This recipe is tested in a 72°F (22°C) environment. Proofing times may vary with ambient temperature. If your kitchen is cooler, keep the dough warm or extend the proofing time. If warmer, the dough may proof faster. The dough should almost double in size and be slightly jiggly but not too airy.

How to Store this Sorghum Bread

For the first 24 hours, store at room temperature in a cotton bag or bread box. If it’s cool in the house, it could be stored for longer outside, if it’s on the warmer (and humid) side, store it in the refrigerator. It can also be sliced, slices separated with parchment paper, and frozen. Reheat in the toaster.

A slice of bread

How to Serve This Gluten-Free Sandwich Bread

As a sandwich bread, I love slicing it thinly to make delicious sandwiches. Sometimes, I toast it in a pan with butter to achieve that beautiful toasty flavor and crust, as seen in the tuna sandwich image at the beginning of this post.

When fresh, it’s perfect with butter, nut butter and jelly, or any topping you fancy. After a day, I prefer to toast it before serving. For the best results, toast it in a pan with butter, though a regular toaster works well too.

If the bread starts to get old, cube it, drizzle with olive oil and your favorite seasonings, and make croutons.

Enjoy your homemade Sorghum Sandwich Bread!

Two slices of bread. One is served with jam.

For another delicious gluten-free bread option, check out our Sorghum Morning Rolls.

For even more healthy and delicious bread alternatives, check out our Lectin-Free Bread Roud-Up.

*This post contains affiliated links, which means I get a small commission if you choose to purchase something via one of my links, at no extra cost to you.

Sorghum Sandwich Bread (Gluten-Free)

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By Claudia Curici, Health Coach Serves: 12 slices
Prep Time: 30 minutes Cooking Time: 40-45 minutes

Our fluffy, light, and soft gluten-free sorghum bread is perfect for satisfying all your sandwich and toast cravings. This easy-to-make recipe requires no special equipment or premade flour mixes—just a handful of simple, globally accessible gluten-free ingredients.

Ingredients

  • WET INGREDIENTS:
  • 17 grams psyllium husk flakes (whole psyllium, not powder)
  • 10 grams maple syrup
  • 10 grams extra virgin olive oil
  • 350 grams lukewarm water (not warmer than 35°C)
  • DRY INGREDIENTS:
  • 230 grams sorghum flour
  • 70 grams tapioca flour (also called starch)
  • 6 grams salt
  • 3 grams active dry yeast
  • ADD-ONS:
  • 2 eggs (115 grams)
  • 40 grams organic sour cream or crème fraîche
  • Mixed seeds for topping (optional)

Instructions

1

Prepare Wet Ingredients: Mix the psyllium husk flakes, maple syrup, olive oil, and lukewarm water in a bowl. Let the mixture sit for a few minutes until it becomes gelatinous.

2

Combine Dry Ingredients: In a larger bowl, combine sorghum flour, tapioca flour, salt, and yeast. Mix well.

3

Form Dough: Add the gelatinous mixture to the dry ingredients. Mix thoroughly with your hand for about 5 minutes until you achieve a homogeneous dough. Shape the dough into a ball using a plastic dough scraper.

4

First Rise: Cover the bowl with the dough, place it in a plastic bag, and let it rest on the counter for 15 minutes.

5

Prepare Add-Ons: While the dough is resting, whisk the eggs and measure out 115 grams. Remove the sour cream or crème fraîche from the fridge so they aren’t too cold when added to the dough.

6

Incorporate Add-Ons: After 15 minutes, mix the eggs and sour cream and add to the dough. Mix well with your hand until fully incorporated and the dough is soft and homogeneous (it will be quite soft, don’t worry).

7

Second Rise: Cover the bowl again, place it back in the plastic bag, and let it rest for another 15 minutes.

8

Prepare Pan: Line a Pullman pan (7” x 4” x 4”) with parchment paper for easy removal of the bread. A normal loaf pan can also be used, but bread will have a different shape.

9

Final Rise: After the second rise, transfer the dough to the prepared pan, level it, sprinkle with seeds, cover it, and place it back in the plastic bag. Let it rise for about 35-40 minutes until the dough almost doubles in size. Make sure it doesn't raise too much, as it will overproof.

10

Bake: Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C). Once the dough has doubled, bake for about 40 - 45 minutes.

11

Cool: Remove the bread from the pan and place it on a cooling rack. Let it cool completely before slicing.

12

Storing: For the first 24 hours, store at room temperature in a cotton bag or bread box. If it’s cool in the house, it could be stored for longer outside, if it’s on the warmer (and humid) side, store it in the refrigerator.

13

Serving: Gluten-free bread tends to hold some extra moisture, so you can toast in a toaster or in butter, on the pan, for extra crispiness.

Notes

YEAST: I use active dry yeast from Denmark, which is mixed with the dry ingredients, as per the package instructions. If you use a different type, adjust accordingly using an online yeast conversion calculator. PROOFING TIME: This recipe is tested in a 72°F (22°C) environment. Proofing times may vary with ambient temperature. If your kitchen is cooler, keep the dough warm or extend the proofing time. If warmer, the dough may proof faster. The dough should almost double in size and be slightly jiggly but not too airy.

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4 Comments

  • Reply
    Emmy
    July 18, 2024 at 12:06 pm

    hi Claudia, it’s good! I haven’t had bread for so long with the lectin free lifestyle. I can imagine all kind of fresh made spreads on it. For now I’ve peeled and deseeded tomatoes, added some mayonaise, grated Italian cheese and basil.. It’s an excellent combination. Have made a big loaf, all sliced up and in the freezer (probably won’t last long)

    • Reply
      Claudia
      July 18, 2024 at 2:13 pm

      Hi Emmy! So glad you loved it. Enjoy! xx -Claudia

  • Reply
    Kim
    July 14, 2024 at 8:02 am

    Super excited to try this as I’ve made a similar one without tapioca before and this looks like it might be a bit lighter.

    So, I just made this bread and noticed when I took it out of the pan to cool a small amount of moisture had collected below the parchment paper.

    It wasn’t a lot but maybe 1/2 TBSP or so. This concerned me so I dumped the water and stuck the loaf back in the oven for 5 more min.

    Any thoughts on what might cause this?

    • Reply
      Claudia
      July 15, 2024 at 5:17 am

      Hi Kim! How long do you leave the loaf in the pan before taking it out? I think that water is just vapors condensing inside the pan due to the difference of temperature. I wouldn’t put the bread back in the oven in the pan, but you can try to give it a few minutes without the pan. I’ve used this method in the past for making a sourdough sandwich loaf, but that was mainly for the sides and bottom of the bread to get a crust and some more color. Next time, take the bread out of the pan immediately, and let it cool on a cooling rack, without the parchment paper. I hope this is helpful. -Claudia

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