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Multi-Purpose Miso Glaze and Seasoning

May 22, 2024 (Last Updated: June 5, 2024)

This miso glaze is a game-changer in the kitchen, offering an easy way to add complex and rich umami flavor to a variety of dishes. Whether you’re enhancing stir-fries, marinating meats, glazing chicken wings, or seasoning stews, this versatile miso glaze delivers exceptional taste. My favorite uses include making delicious, sticky chicken wings and seasoning stir-fries and sautéed vegetables.

The Inspiration

This miso glaze recipe was born out of an attempt to create rich, savory, sticky chicken wings. The umami concoction I developed resulted in the best chicken wings I’ve ever had, delivering incredible depth of flavor and a sticky texture without any questionable ingredients.

Another reason I try to find ways to incorporate miso into my diet is its gut health benefits, including enzymes, amino acids, and beneficial bacteria.

As I experimented, I began adding this miso glaze to various dishes, and it never disappoints if you love Asian-inspired flavors. The possibilities are endless. Any stir-fry can benefit from it, and it’s perfect as a glaze for chicken wings, other types of chicken, or spare ribs.

When making an Asian-inspired stir-fry, gathering all the necessary sauces and condiments—miso, coconut aminos, mirin, rice vinegar, toasted sesame oil—can be time-consuming and, in a small kitchen like mine, it can take a lot of counter space. Having all these ingredients pre-mixed and ready in the fridge makes meal preparation much easier.

If you love Asian flavors, this miso glaze is a simple way to enhance your meals without much effort.

What is Hatcho Miso?

Hatcho miso is a traditional variety of miso produced in the Hatcho area of Okazaki City, Aichi Prefecture, Japan. With a history spanning over 600 years, it is renowned for its high-quality and artisanal production methods.

This unpasteurized, fermented whole soybean paste undergoes an extended fermentation process lasting two to three years. This lengthy fermentation period imparts a deep, rich flavor. The miso is fermented in large cedar vats, with heavy stones placed on top to apply pressure, contributing to its unique texture and taste.

The prolonged fermentation process results in higher concentrations of beneficial compounds such as enzymes, amino acids, and antioxidants. It also removes antinutrients in soy, especially lectins. Additionally, Hatcho miso has a higher protein content compared to other miso varieties.

Can I Use Other Types of Miso Paste?

While I prefer Hatcho miso for its long fermentation time and robust flavor, you can use any type of miso paste you prefer. Be aware that the flavor profile, color, and texture will differ slightly, with other types typically being lighter and sweeter.

For the best quality, always choose an organic brand, ideally one made in Japan.

Ingredients

Note on sweeteners: If you avoid caloric sweeteners, the best alternative would be Allulose syrup or another type of low-glycemic sweeteners such as Lakanto or Yacon syrup.

Why Use Coconut Aminos?

Typically, Asian sauces contain soy sauce, but we choose to avoid this ingredient. The primary reason is that soy sauce is made from soy, which contains lectins. You might wonder, since soy sauce is fermented like miso paste, wouldn’t that fermentation process destroy the lectins?

That’s a great question. The issue with soy sauce is that only about 1% of it is made using traditional fermentation methods. Genuine, artisanal soy sauce is very rare (and expensive), and unless you can source it from a traditional producer in Japan, we recommend using coconut aminos instead. Coconut aminos offer a similar flavor without the concerns associated with modern soy sauce production.

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl, combine all the ingredients.
  2. Mix until a creamy, thick paste is formed.
  3. Transfer the glaze to an airtight glass jar.
  4. Store in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

Tips:

  • Preserving Enzymes: To retain the beneficial enzymes in miso, add the glaze towards the end of the cooking process, as prolonged cooking can destroy these enzymes.

Usage Suggestions:

  • Chicken Wings: Cook the wings with a dry rub and extra virgin olive oil, then apply the glaze in the last 5 minutes of cooking (recipe link provided at the beginning of this article). The same technique can be used for spare ribs.
  • Salmon fillets: I’m sure you’ve already heard of miso glazed salmon. This miso glaze works exceptionally well with wild-caught salmon.
  • Asparagus or other sauteed vegetables: Use about 1 tablespoon to season two servings.
  • Stew: Use approximately 2 tablespoons to season four servings of stew (other seasonings are used).
  • General Use: Adjust the amount based on the dish and other condiments or seasonings being used. One tablespoon of miso glaze can season one to two cups of liquid.
White Asparagus with Miso Glaze and Toasted Sesame Seeds

Notes

Each type of miso has a distinct flavor profile. Hatcho miso has a strong, rich flavor, while white miso is lighter and sweeter. Adjust the quantity based on the miso type and your taste preference.

More Condiments and Sauces

For more healthy sauce and condiment ideas, I hope these recipes will inspire you:

*This post contains affiliated links, which means I get a small commission if you choose to purchase something via one of my links, at no extra cost to you.

Multi-Purpose Miso Glaze and Seasoning

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By Claudia Curici, Health Coach Serves: 8
Prep Time: 5-10 minutes

This miso glaze is a game-changer in the kitchen, offering an easy way to add complex and rich umami flavor to a variety of dishes. Whether you're enhancing stir-fries, marinating meats, glazing chicken wings, or seasoning stews, this versatile miso glaze delivers exceptional taste. My favorite uses include making delicious, sticky chicken wings and seasoning stir-fries and sautéed vegetables.

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons Hatcho miso paste (other types of miso can be used)
  • 2 tablespoons coconut aminos
  • 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
  • 2 teaspoons mirin
  • 2 teaspoons rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup, allulose syrup, monk fruit syrup, yacon syrup, or any liquid sweetener of your choice

Instructions

1

In a medium bowl, combine all the ingredients and mix until a creamy, thick paste is formed.

2

Transfer the glaze to an airtight glass jar and store in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

3

Preserving Enzymes: To retain the beneficial enzymes in miso, add the glaze towards the end of the cooking process, as heat can destroy these enzymes.

Notes

Please check post above for ingredient links, usage suggestions and other tips.

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